DEPARTMENT OF PURE AND APPLIED BOTANY (PAB) 

Degree awarded: B.Sc. (Hons) Pure and Applied Botany 

 

Introduction 

The Department of Pure and Applied Botany will be derived from the Department of Biological Sciences, which was a foundation Department in 1988. The new department would focus on the training of students in all aspect of pure and applied Botany necessary for national development.  

 

Philosophy and Objectives 

i.  To deepen the knowledge of students in general and applied areas of Botany so as to inculcate in them the role of plants in human development. 

ii.  To train students on scientific research methodologies and tools in pure and applied Botany.  

iii.  To provide high level manpower relevant to national needs in universities, industries, research institutes and self-employment. 

iv.  To train students in skills and abilities relating to intellectual tasks including problem solving. 

The programme is structured to include period of formal studies (lecture, practical and tutorial), industrial training, planned field trips and research projects. Emphasis is given  to computer training as well as using practical approach to solving problems in Pure and Applied Botany. 

 

Duration of the programme 

The duration of the B.Sc. degree in Pure and Applied Zoology shall normally be four academic sessions (8 semesters) for students admitted into the 100 level and three academic sessions (six semesters) for those that come in through Direct Entry at 200 level. 

 

Admission Requirements: 

The general admission requirements are as follows: UME: Senior Secondary School Certificate (SSCE) credit passes or ‘O’ level credits in five subjects including English, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology.  Transferred candidates may be exempted from certain relevant courses they have passed in their former Universities before transferring to Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta.  

 

Minimum Academic Requirements for Graduation.  To qualify for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Sciences (Pure and Applied Botany), a student must have fulfilled the following approved minimum academic standards: 

i.  Spent not less than 2, 3 or 4 years on the programme depending on point of entry 

ii.  Passed all the University (compulsory) courses 

iii.  Passed all the department’s (core) courses and the required electives 

iv.  Must not have exceeded the minimum periods specified above by more than two years 

v.  Must have a CGPA of 1.5 

DISTRIBUTION OF COURSE UNITS 

The distribution of the course units is as shown below: 

 

LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF 

Name  Qualification  Specialisation  Designation 

1. Iyabo A. Kehinde  B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D (Ibadan) Plant Pathology  Reader & Ag. Head of Department 

2. M Kadiri  B.Sc (Kano), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Ibadan) Plant Physiology Professor 

3. A. A. Agboola  B.Sc (Nsukka) M.Sc., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Plant Physiology Professor  

 

Name  Qualification  Specialisation  Designation 

4. M.S. Ayodele  B.Sc (Ife), M.Sc. (Ilorin), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Ile-Ife) Reproductive Biology and Plant Systematics Professor 

5. A.S. Oyelakin  B.Sc., M.Sc. (Abeokuta) Plant Taxonomy Assistant Lecturer 

6. O. O. Fawibe  B.Sc. M.Sc. (Abeokuta) Plant Physiology Assistant Lecturer 

 

TECHNICAL STAFF 

Name  Qualification  Designation 

7. Olufunmilayo. A. Olanloye HND., PGD (Abeokuta)  Principal Technologist 

8. Olukemi S. Olakehinde  HND (Abeokuta)  Technologist I 

 

 ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF  

Name  Qualification  Rank 

9. Kudirat A.A. Sonde  50WPM Chief Sec. Assist. 

10. Kudirat F. Owoseni  SSSC  Senior Clerical Officer 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

BI0 101: GENERAL BIOLOGY I (2 Units) 

The plant cell, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, cell growth, cell division and reproduction, Introduction to  plant classification: General characteristics and morphology of cryptogams, pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. 

BIO 103: INTRODUCTORY PHYSIOLOGY (2 Units) 

Nature of Living organism/Activities of Living things, Homeostasis, Growth and Development,  Endocrine system, Respiration, Reproduction, Nutrition and Enzymes, Digestion, Excretion. 

BIO 191: PRACTICAL BIOLOGY I (1 Unit) 

Practical classes for BIO 101 and BIO 103  

BOT 102: FLOWERING PLANTS, FORMS AND FUNCTIONS (2 Units) 

Variation in plant  attributes: morphological attributes and their functions in plants 

BOT 105: DIVERSITY OF PLANTS (3 Units) 

Plant forms (habit), variations of form within and between habits. Plant eco-variations, strategies of diversity, application of diversity, importance of diversity 

BIO 201: GENERAL ECOLOGY (2 Units) 

Aims and Scope of ecology; basic units of ecology (Population, Community and Ecosystem); biotic and abiotic components of an ecosystem. Production in ecosystems, energy flow and nutrient cycling.  Dynamics  of population and communities. 

 

BIO 202: BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES (2 Units) 

Botanical and Zoological techniques: Microscope, preparation of microscope slides, photometry, colorimetry, chromatography, conductometry, experimental design. Fluid preservation, injection and corrosion techniques. Specialized preservation technique (e.g. plastination, embalming). Fixation and preservation, wax-embedding, microtomy, staining and mounting, cytological preparations, photomicrography, herbarium practices, field work and population sampling, water culture and maintenance of experimental plants.  

 BIO 204:  RESEARCH METHODS (2 Units) 

Research needs in Biology. Experimental and non-experimental methods. Generalization, basic data analysis Methodology and result analysis.  Preparation of scientific reports and manuscript Reference citing, and listing. Type of Referencing methods. Introduction to Reference Manager softwares 

BOT 205: TROPICAL ETHNOBOTANICAL PLANTS (2 Units)  

Plants used by indigenous people of West Africa for plant, animal and human diseases. Plants used as dyes, food colours, preservatives and pesticides. Collection and preservation of ethnobotanical plants. 

 BOT 207: INTRODUCTORY PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 

Definition of molecular biology, basic laboratory techniques in molecular biology. Molecular biology of plant and plant disease identification. 

 

BOT 221: SEEDLESS PLANTS (3 Units) 

A survey of the evolution, morphology, ecology and importance to man of the Cryptograms and Pteridophytes. A survey of the major types of development in seedless plants. 

 

BOT 202:  ANGIOSPERM (2 Units) 

General organization of the angiosperm; including the treatment of variations in the structure of the roots, stems, leaves, inflorescence, flowers, fruits and seeds. 

 

BOT 204: PLANT DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (2 Units) 

Heritable and non-heritable characteristics, probability and tests of goodness of fit. Quantitative inheritance, variations in genome structure. Introduction to population genetics. Current concept in evolution. Genetic variation and appreciation. Evolution of selected organisms.   

 

BOT 206:  PLANT CELL BIOLOGY and MOLECULAR GENETICS (2 Units) 

History and present trends in cell biology.  Reproduction cell division.  Cell differentiation and growth of cells.  A brief study of  the molecular basis of cell structure and development, organelles and nucleic acids. 

 

BOT 208:  GENERAL PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (2 Units) 

The fundermental principle of plant physiology including photosynthesis, respiration, cell-water relationship, mineral nutrition uptake and deficiency, symptoms, enzyme and hormonal production 

 

BOT 301:  PLANT GENETICS  (2 Units) 

Aspect of human genetics: pedigree analysis.  Further consideration of various deviations from basic principles gene interaction haard-Weinbergg Law Mutagenesis Sex determination. 

 

BOT 303:  PLANT ECOLOGY (3 Units) 

Themes of energy; antecology, historical aspects.  Current trends in ecology.  Plant community hypotheses.  Concepts of ecosystem: food chain, webs, interaction between plants and animals.  Ecological groups, dystrophytes, halophyes, epiphyses and nesophites.  The effect of physical environment on plants.  Climate, biotic and topographic factors. 

 

BOT 305 – BOTANY FIELD COURSE (1 Unit) 

Trip to various locations to enable better understanding of  the different vegetations and plant diversity. 

 

BOT 321:  SEED PLANTS (2 Units) 

A survey of the evolution, morphology, ecology and importance to man of the Gymnosperms and Angiosperms.  A survey of the major types of development of embryo in gymnosperms and angiosperms. 

 

BOT 323:  COMPARATIVE PLANT ANATOMY I (3 Units) 

Characteristics and classification of tissues systems, organization of meristem, evolution vascular tissues, comparative wood anatomy.  Anatomical adaptations to specialized habitats.  Applied aspects of plant anatomy. 

 

BOT 325:  MYCOLOGY (3 Units) 

Structure, life cycles, physiology and classification of fungi.  The presence and role of fungi in medicine, agriculture, food and industry, mycotic infections, epidemiology of fungal diseases and  economic importance of fungi in Agriculture, Food and Industry.   

 

BOT 327:  BRYOLOGY AND PTERIDOPHYTES (2 Units) 

Structure and reproduction of the bryophytes and pteridophytes, spore dispersal mechanism.  Pteridophytes, Bryophyte life-history, the protonemal, gametyphytic and sporophytic phases.  Taxonomic considerations: family, genus, species, subspecies, variety and form concepts.  Treatment of selected families and genera. 

 

BOT 329:  PLANT TAXONOMY AND BIOSYSTEMATICS (2 Units) 

Taxonomy and its significance, principles and concepts in plant taxonomy. Construction and use of taxonomic keys.  Experimental taxonomy with special emphasis cytotaxonomy and chemotaxonomy. 

 

BOT 331: BIOMETRY (2 Units) 

Principle of design of control experiment, including replication, blocking, reduction of experimental errors. ANOVA, factorial design, Latin Square, Split plot, repeated measures. Introduction to Statistical softwares: STATA, R, SPSS and SAS.   

 

BOT 392:  INDUSTRIAL TRAINING ASSESSMENT (4 Units) 

Assessment of log books on 6 months industrial training spent by the students in botany related industry or agricultural establishment. 

 

BOT 394: INDUSTRIAL TRAINING VISITATION (4 Units) 

On the stop assessment of six months of industrial training must be spent by the students in a botany related industry or agricultural establishment. Focus should be on work carried out by student and ability to understand basic scientific methods and principles at work place.  

 

BOT 396: INDUSTRIAL TRAINING REPORTS (4 Units) 

Assessment of scientific writing of industrial training report 

 

BOT 398: INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SEMINAR (4 Units) 

Final Seminar on topics related to industrial training experiences must be presented by student at the end of the second semester. 

 

BOT 401:  PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (2 Units) 

Principles and concepts in plant pathology, causes of host-parasite relationship, infection and pathogenesis.  Culture of fungi, diagnostic features, recognition and control diseases of major importance. 

 

BOT 403:  CURRENT TOPIC SEMINAR IN BOTANY (2 Units)  UNIVERSITY CALENDAR: 2014 – 2017 Page 567 

Under the supervision of staff the student is expected to select a seminar topic for detailed study, using library methods.  The emphasis should be on recent advances in chosen field.  The course is expected to give the student the opportunity for  independent thought and expression. The study will result in seminars. 

 

BOT 405:  PLANT PATHOLOGY (2 Units) 

Principles and concept of plant pathology, causes of diseases, host-parasite relationship.  Infection and pathogenesis. Culture of fungi, diagnostic features; recognition and control of diseases of major importance  

 

BOT 407:  NIGERIAN VEGETATION (2 Units) 

A study of Nigerian forests, savannah grasslands and special emphasis on arid zones. 

 

BOT 409:  ECONOMIC BOTANY (2 Units) 

The origin, history, sources, taxonomy, morphology and cultivation of Nigeria economic plant species (food, fibre, medicinal, forage, cereals, timber, etc.). 

 

BOT 411:  PLANT CYTOGENESIS (2 Units) 

Review of cell organization and cell division. Principle of inheritance, gene expression and interaction. Linkage and cross over. Variation in chromosome number and structure. Determination of sex, mutation and cytoplasmic inheritance. 

 

BOT 413: PLANT REPRODUCTION (3 Units) 

Sexual and asexual (vegetative reproduction review), meiosis and  mitosis, haploidy and diplody role in plant reproduction. Typical plant reproduction organ in lower and higher plants (primitive and advance forms), basic differences between plant and animal reproduction. Gametophytic and sporophytic phases (alternation  of generation). Strategies in variation of reproductive organs, pollination and fertilization. Fruits and seeds as end products. 

 

BOT 415: ENTREPRENUSHIP OPPORTUNITIES IN BOTANY (2 Units) 

Seedling production enterprises: raising seedling for aesthetics, medicine, food, clothing and shelter. Plant collection and supply enterprise. Mushroom cultivation: Cultivation of edible and medicinal mushrooms. Plant disease diagnostics: identification of plant and plant disease causing organisms. 

 

BOT 417: PALEOBOTANY AND PALEONTOLOGY (3 Units) 

Overview of Paleobotany, evolution and plants, diversification of land  plants, Rise and dominance of seed plants, Origin and diversification of flowering plants. Fossils studies of extinct plants species 

 

BOT 421: CONSERVATION AND BIODIVERSITY (3 Units) 

Plant Biodivesity, structure and reproduction. Conversion methods for plants, Introduction to Botanical Garden. 

 

BOT 499:  RESEARCH PROJECT (6 Units) 

A student will be expected to carry out a field/detailed research investigation under supervision of a staff in any special area of Botany, write up a project report and be examined for his/her knowledge of the work before a panel of internal examiners in an oral examination. 

 

BOT 402:  POPULATION ECOLOGY (3 Units) 

Demographic characteristics of natural populations and techniques of estimating the growth and regulation of population.  Population. 

 

BIO 404:  INTRODUCTORY BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS (3 Units) 

History and evolution of the new technology, different areas of biotechnology including genetic engineering, cell culture, biomass production and technology, enzymes technology, immobilized cell and enzymes, biofuels, microbial insecticides and nitrogen fixation.  Potential application of biotechnology in the developing countries  in the area of agriculture, health and energy.  Social and economic importance of biotechnology. Introduction to Bioinformatics, Genomics and Proteonomics, Gene banks, Bioinformatics softwares,  

 

BOT 406:  PLANT TISSUE CULTURE (2 Units) 

Meristems and organizations of the shot and root apices. Pattern and control of cell tissue differentiation. Development of vegetative organs. Plant tissue culture techniques and applications. Meristems culture, organ culture, embryo culture. The role of plant hormones and vitamins, ontogeny of floral organs 

 

BOT 408:  MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (2 Units) 

Plant nuclear and organelle, genome organization, gene structure, mechanism of gene regulation, gene transfer and special topics related to development and response to biological and environmental stimuli.  

 

BOT 426:  PLANT ANATOMY II (3 Units) 

The structure and properties of the cell wall.  Structure of wood and wood identification. Anatomy of plant growing in different and ecological areas.  Anomalous secondary growth in plants.  Plant micro-techniques. 

BOT 428:  GENETICS OF WEED AND PESTS (3 Units) 

The evolutionary and economic implications of weeds as the vegetation of the future.  Anthropogenic factors in the evolution of weeds.  Weeds-crop ecosystem and co-evolution, weeds as alternative hosts of crop pests.  Modes of weed evolution with examples in plant families.  Prospects for genetic control of weeds.  Pattern of adaptation and genetic variation in insects.  The problem of heritable resistance to insecticides.  Genetic control pests. 

 

NOTES 

THE FOLLOWING BIOLOGY COURSES ARE DOMICLED IN THE DEPARTMENT 

•  BIO 101: General Biology I 

•  BIO 191: Practical Biology I 

•  BIO 201: General Ecology 

•  BIO 204: Research Methods 

•  BIO 404: Introductory Biotechnology and Bioinformatics 

  

DEPARTMENT OF PURE AND APPLIED ZOOLOGY (PAZ) 

 

Degree awarded: B.Sc. (Hons) Pure and Applied Zoology 

 

Introduction 

The Department of Pure and Applied Zoology will be derived from the Department of Biological Sciences, which was a foundation Department in 1988. The new department would focus on the training of students in all aspect of pure and applied Zoology necessary for national development.   

Philosophy and Objectives 

i.  To deepen the knowledge of students in general and applied areas of Zoology so as to  inculcate in them the role of plants in human development. 

ii.  To train students on scientific research methodologies and tools in pure and applied Zoology.  

iii.  To provide high level manpower relevant to national needs in universities, industries, research institutes and self-employment. 

iv.  To train students in skills and abilities relating to intellectual tasks including problem solving. 

The programme is structured to include period of formal studies (lecture, practical, and tutorial), industrial training, planned field trips and projects. 

Emphasis is given to computer training as well as using practical approach to solve Pure and Applied Zoology problems. 

 

Duration of the programme 

The duration of the B.Sc. degree in Pure and Applied Zoology shall normally be four academic sessions (8 semesters) for students admitted into the 100 level and three academic sessions (six semesters) for those that come in through Direct Entry at 200 level. 

 

Admission Requirements: 

The general admission requirements are as follows: 

UME:  Senior Secondary School Certificate (SSCE) credit passes or ‘O’ level credits in five subjects including English, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology.  Transferred candidates may be exempted from certain relevant courses they have passed in their former Universities before transferring to Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. 

Minimum Academic Requirements for Graduation  

To qualify for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Sciences (Pure and Applied Zoology), a student must have fulfilled  the following approved minimum academic standards: 

i.  Spent not less than2, 3 or 4 years on the programme depending on point of entry 

ii.  Passed all the University (compulsory) courses 

iii.  Passed all the department’s (core) courses and the required electives 

iv.  Must  not have exceeded the minimum periods specified above by more than two years 

v.  Must have a CGPA of 1.5 

 

THE DISTRIBUTION OF COURSE UNITS 

The distribution of the course units is as shown below: 

 

LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF 

Name  Qualification  Specialisation  Designation 

1. U.F. Ekpo  B. Sc., (Calabar), M.Sc., (Ibadan) Ph.D. (Abeokuta) Parasitology and Epidemiology Reader & Ag. HOD 

2. A.B. Idowu  B. Sc., (Ado-Ekiti) M.Sc.,  PhD (Ibadan) Animal Physiology  Professor 

3. S. O. Sam-Wobo B. Sc., M.Sc., PhD (Abeokuta) Public Health Parasitology and Epidemiology Reader 

4. OlufunmilayoA. Idowu B. Sc., (Ibadan), M.Sc. (Lagos),  PhD (Abeokuta) Public Health Parasitology Reader 

5. O.A. Oke  B. Sc., M.Sc., PhD (Ibadan) Entomology and Ecology Senior Lecturer 

6. G.A. Dedeke  B.Sc.,(Ago-Iwoye) M.Sc.(Ibadan), Ph.D. (Ago-Iwoye) Animal Physiology/Ecology Senior Lecturer  

7. K.O.Ademolu  B. Sc., M.Sc. PhD (Abeokuta) Animal Physiology  Senior Lecturer  

8. A.A. Aladesida  B.Sc., M.Sc. PhD (Ago-Iwoye) Animal Taxonomy & Ecology Lecturer II 

 

TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

NAME  QUALIFICATION  RANK 

9. S. O. Bankole  HND (Abeokuta)  Principal Technologist 

10. Taiwo O. Abiodun  SSSC  Senior Laboratory Assistant 

11. Kudirat A.A Sonde  50WPM  Chief Sec. Assist  

 

 COURSE DESCRIPTION 

 

100 LEVEL – FIRST SEMESTER 

BIO 101: GENERAL BIOLOGY I (2 Units) 

The plant cell, Procaryotic and Eukaryotic cells, cell growth, Cell division and Reproduction, Introduction to Plant Classification: General characteristics and morphology of cryptogams, pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. 

 

BIO 103: INTRODUCTORY PHYSIOLOGY (2 Units) 

Nature of Living organism/Activities of Living things, Homeostasis, Growth and Development, Endocrine system, Respiration,  Reproduction, Nutrition and Enzymes, Digestion, Excretion. 

 

BIO 191: PRACTICAL BIOLOGY I (1 Units) 

Practical classes for BIO 101 and BIO 103 

 

ZOO 101: THE MAMMALIAN BODY (2 Units) 

The anatomy and physiology of the mammal and adaptation to the environment. External features, skin, skeletal and muscular systems. Digestion and absorption of food; nutrition. Gas exchange and transport. The blood and circulatory system. The kidney and homeostasis. Nervous and chemical coordination. Maturation, sexuality and reproduction in man. 

 

BIO 102: GENERAL BIOLOGY II (2 UNITS) 

Basic principles of Zoological nomenclature, Outline classification of Animal kingdom, introduction to various animal phyla: Protozoa, Coelenterata, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Annelida, Molusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Chordata. 

 

BIO 192: PRACTICAL BIOLOGY II (1 UNIT) 

Practical classes for BIO 102  

 

ZOO 104: DIVERSITY OF ANIMALS (2 UNITS) 

Diversity of Animal forms, structures and functions. Multicellularity and development of embryonic layers; History of animal diversity, Basis of categorization of the diversity of animals (symmetry, organization of tissues, body cavity, developmental mode, fate of plastophore); major feature of animal phylogenetics tree; introduction to animal systematic;  geographical distribution of animal life and issues in the conservation of biodiversity with emphasis on Nigerian species. 

 

BIO 201 – GENERAL ECOLOGY (2 Units) 

Aims and Scope of ecology, basic units of ecology (Population, Community and Ecosystem), biotic  and abiotic components of an ecosystem.  Production in ecosystems.  Energy flow and nutrient cycling.  Dynamics of population and communities. 

 

ZOO 203 – HISTOLOGY (2 UNITS)  

The cellular basis of tissue formation. Main features of animal cells, tissue, organs and organ system. Histological and histochemical techniques. Cell communication. Stability of the differentiated state. Principles and preparation of microscope slides. 

 

ZOO 261 –INTERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY I (2 Units) 

Identification, phylogenic, general biology, behaviour and economic importance of acelomate invertebrate: protozoa, porifera, coelenterates and platyhelminths including some basic principles of zoological nomenclature. 

BIO 202 – BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES (2 UNITS) 

Botanical and Zoological techniques: Microscope, preparation of microscope slides, photometry, colorimetry, chromatography, conductometry, experimental design. Fluid preservation, injection and corrosion techniques. Specialized preservation technique (e.g. plastination, embalming). Fixation and preservation, wax-embedding, microtomy, staining and mounting, cytological preparations, photomicrography, herbarium practices, field work and population sampling, water culture and maintenance of experimental plants. 

 

BIO 204:  RESEARCH METHODS (2 Units) 

Research needs in Biology. Experimental and non experimental methods. Generalization, basic data analysis Methodology and result analysis.  Preparation of scientific reports and manuscript Reference citing, and listing. Type of Referencing methods. Introduction to Reference Manager softwares 

 

ZOO 202:  INTRODUCTORY GENETICS AND EVOLUTION (2 Units)  

Heritable and non-heritable characteristics, probability and tests of goodness of fit.  Quantitative inheritance, variations ingenome structure.  Introduction to population genetics.  Current concept in evolution.  Genetic variation and appreciation.  Evolution of selected organisms. 

 

ZOO 206:  GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY (2 Units) 

Metabolism and energy production, circulatory system of animals.  Homeostasis, nervous and hormonal control of systems.  Excretion and osmoregulation.  A survey of the fundamental principles of plant physiology including photosynthesis respiration, cell-water relationship, mineral nutrition, nutrient uptake and deficiency, symptoms.  

 

ZOO 309 – GENETIC II 

Aspect of animal genetics: pedigree analysis.  Further consideration of various deviations from basic principles gene interaction haard-Weinbergg Law Mutagenesis Sex determination. 

 

ZOO 315  – LOCAL FAUNA (2 UNITS) 

General survey of  local animals such as protozoan, nematodes, mollusks, arthropods and vertebrates. 

 

ZOO 317 – FIELD EXPERIENCE 

This is designed to give students an opportunity to carry out a small independent research project during field trips to areas of zoological interest in the country. Student are expected to submit report of their field visit. 

 

ZOO 361 – ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY (3 UNITS) 

Adaptive radiation within the phylum arthropoda, structure and functions of the body appendages. Insect evolution, classification and  distribution. Behaviour and ecology of social insects. \ 

 

ZOO 363 – BIOLOGY OF TROPICAL PARASITES (3 UNITS) 

Classification, adaptation, morphology, life cycles and any other features of interest in the protozoans, platyhelminths, nematodes and parasitic arthropods, paying particular attention to the various adaptations of their group. Host parasites relations. Host susceptibility and specificity; Resistance and immunity. Facultative and obligate parasitism. Ecto and endoparasitism. Parasites of medical and veterinary importance. 

 

ZOO 365 – CHORDATES (2 UNITS) 

The diversity of vertebrate life. Basic organization and general biology of hemichordate. Urochordate, cephalochordate, Agnatha, Pisces, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. Nigeria or tropical West Africa examples to be used as much as possible. 

 

ZOO 367 – PRINCIPLES & PATTERN OF EVOLUTION (2 UNITS) 

Current concepts in evolution. Geological periods and epochs. Fossilization and fossils. Methods of estimating geologic and fossil ages. Estimates of the age of the earth. Theories of evolution of life from non-living matter. Genetic variations, natural selection and specification. Evolutionary gaps and the theory of punctuated equilibrium. Case study of evolution of selected organisms. 

 

ZOO 369 – PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL DEVELOPMENT (2 UNITS) 

Gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and organogenesis in branchiostoma, amphibian, aves and mammalian, growth and differentiation, metamorphosis and regeneration. 

 

ZOO 371 – COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (3 UNITS) 

A comparative study of the integument and the digestive, respiratory, urinogenital, circulatory, nervous, muscular and skeletal systems of living vertebrates to illustrate the major adaptive change that have occurred during their evolution from fish to mammals 

 

ZOO 392:  INDUSTRIAL TRAINING ASSESSMENT (4 Units) 

Assessment of log books on 6 months industrial training spent by the students in botany related industry or agricultural establishment. 

 

ZOO 394: INDUSTRIAL TRAINING VISITATION (4 Units) 

On  the stop assessment of six months of industrial training must be spent by the students in a botany related industry or agricultural establishment. Focus should be on work carried out by student and ability to understand basic scientific methods and principles at work place.  

 

ZOO 396: INDUSTRIAL TRAINING REPORTS (4 Units) 

Assessment of scientific writing of industrial training report 

 

ZOO 398: INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SEMINAR (4 Units) 

Final Seminar on topics related to industrial training experiences must be presented by student at the end of the second semester. 

 

ZOO 497: CURRENT TOPICS’ SEMINAR IN ZOOLOGY (2 UNITS) 

The student shall under the supervision of an academic staff select a seminar topic for detailed study (review) using library methods. The emphasis should  

 

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Higher Degree

2003 – 2004 Session
2005 – 2006 Session
2005 – 2006 Session
2006 – 2007 Session
2006 – 2007 Session
2008 – 2009 Session
2008 – 2009 Session
2001 – 2002 Session
1996 – 1997 Session
2002 – 2003 Session

Last Updated on November 5, 2009 by admin